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  1. Dennis, I consider you a patriot for Samoa and would welcome your opinions back living in Samoa under a less hostile government. I value all that you say even though I do not agree with all of your conclusions.

    Dennis try to list all of the good qualities of the Samoan people in a single blog rather than merely highlighting the negative, as an exercise in humility.

    I consider your work a treasure to the nation.

    • > Dennis, I consider you a patriot for Samoa and would welcome your opinions back living in Samoa under a less hostile government.
      Sadly, I doubt that could ever happen. When you understand that the PM knew and knows full well who I represent, you will understand that this is a spiritual war. The hostility from TPTB is not towards me personally, although I have paid the price personally. The hostility is to the One who sent me. Sonja and Tui both from the outset knew the score. First Sonja in our first meeting knew that I could not be bought [thus was a threat], and secondly Tuila’epa and I frequently referred back to my first words to him that “I believed that the Lord sent me!” Rest assured that he knew VERY well what this was all about! This all occurred in Q4 2009 post Tsunami and before I emigrated. You can’t get more direct than that!

      > I value all that you say even though I do not agree with all of your conclusions.
      Thank you and for the maturity to agree not to agree! Opinionated people are the natural result of truthseeking and thinking! When or if you ever come to see things my way, and realise the conclusions I come to are more valid than yours, please remember my words and drop me a note. 🙂 You are also welcome to exercise your Right of Reply and share alternative views. I only very lightly moderate comments here.

      > Dennis try to list all of the good qualities of the Samoan people in a single blog rather than merely highlighting the negative, as an exercise in humility.
      I have one and a half million words on this blog with a large part of it discussing the Samoan culture from a Christian perspective. I think it has a good balance between a love for the Samoan people and their ways and criticism of where Samoa misses the mark. I’m dedicated to revealing the Truth. My love for Samoa comes from my faith and from my obedience to a calling. I lived there for seven years but was rejected, virtually daily and then finally from the PM. When I lived in Samoa, many who knew me said that I was more Samoan than they were. I taught Fa’a Samoa through practical living teaching and mentoring to hundreds of Palagi guests. When I lost all as a result of Tuila’epa’s cowardice I exercised extreme restraint by waiting a year before saying or doing anything, and even to this day the hurt at this injustice is palpable. I think I have demonstrated massive humility to those who know the true me. Gossip and political agendas aside!

      > I consider your work a treasure to the nation.
      Maybe so. I think I am in a unique position and have a specific calling to speak as I do. It’s not easy to get the balance right but I think I have the authority to speak as I do, having paid a high price and being obedient. I’m not sure where or what He wants me to do into the future regarding Samoa. It may be that my job is done . . . it may be that there is more, but the latest post (the one about the Ideal) and the book Palemia UNMASKED!! would be a natural close of this chapter in my life. Not sure. Thank you for responding – bless you.

  2. With all due respect Dennis…
    You say you lost everything in Samoa.
    You lost all your possessions (including money) but more importantly you lost your family.
    Who are you blaming? Do you blame yourself or others? Or was this part of your lesson in life by God?
    I’ll put this another way….
    Now with hindsight…if you were able to go back in time what would you have done differently?
    Or If someone (eg palagi) with plenty of money and his family were planning to move to Samoa what would you advise them.

    • Well those are pretty direct questions Keith!
      > You say you lost everything in Samoa.
      Almost. I gained credibility in some narrow circles – people like yourself who know/knew what actually happened. I gained enormous knowledge and understanding – I think any costly experience gives you that. I also know that I was obedient to the One who called me. That’s a huge gain, again similar to any sacrifice one makes. All else though – yes lost. Health, wealth, hard labours in Samoa, relationships of virtually all sorts.
      > Who are you blaming? Do you blame yourself or others? Or was this part of your lesson in life by God?
      I’m not sure that blame is the right word, but it might be. http://www.palemia.com shoots very directly at the PM as the chief architect of my eventual eviction and loss, although his hands were tied to some extent because his life was compromised sexually and Sonja was the chief troublemaker the entire time I was there. All gossip seemed to lead back to STA eventually, and she was the one that caught Tuila’epa out when he asked us to work with her on the Samoa day project. I don’t blame myself directly, because I had to learn, and yes I did eventually learn.
      > Now with hindsight…if you were able to go back in time what would you have done differently?
      I’d never be able to achieve or do what I did if I did have a chance to do things differently. The reason is a little hard to explain but I’ll try. When you are obedient to the Lord and the situation is all new, you bring an innocence to the situation that the Lord uses for His purposes. I didn’t know about Sonja and the PM. I just innocently walked right into the centre of power and disturbed an immoral relationship unwittingly. I was simply a Palagi guy introducing myself and making myself available to help, and the top dog wanted me involved, but his Mistress didn’t. I had no idea what corruption existed, nor what the significance was of spending quality time with the PM at the outset, spiritually, personally and also socially in Samoan culture. Knowing what I know now, I could never have been who I was and done what I did back then. I simply wouldn’t get a look in the door. The journey I undertook was a valid learning experience and got me to where I am today, able to talk with a degree of authority, credibility and I hope wisdom. In terms of practical things I would never have sold my family home and taken money up there if I knew how things really worked – never. It was great to live mortgage free, but with the time I was up there the land value of the family home I sold alone increased by $1m NZD. That hurts, having to start afresh on my return, knowing how wealthy I would have been if I didn’t sell, but hey I did what I thought was right at the time!
      > Or If someone (eg palagi) with plenty of money and his family were planning to move to Samoa what would you advise them.
      We’re all different Keith, and I don’t think it is really a money issue either. It would be easy to say, “Watch out! Don’t do it! Keep your primary assets off-island. Don’t trust anyone . . .” and so on, but that might not be appropriate for all. I think it’s hard for Papalagi to really understand how the racism, greed and corruption affect us as foreigners in Samoa. I’m more direct than most – I shoot straight and invited a truckload of gossip because of my style. Let’s face it it’s not normal human conduct to bait the PM to boot you out in a book called Corruption in Samoa and argue with a man who has the power to hurt! There are a small number of Palagi who marry, conduct business and live and survive up there. Some even do quite well financially [the ones who know how to play the game!] but it’s not common and most struggle with the negatives of the culture. In a Christian sense I don’t think I’d want to go for missionary purposes in the normal ways – there is a huge need for demonstration and uptake of genuine faith-full Christianity, but the country is in a state of religious overload from more than a century of chronic religious fervour. I don’t see meaningful change occurring in the current or perhaps even the next generation. I think Samoans have to learn the hard way and that the Holy Spirit needs desperation right across society before He is given the authority he needs to affect His purposes. Israel needed 40 years in the desert. I think there is a very long way to go in Samoa yet. That said, if one does what I did and go out of obedience to a clear calling, and hangs in there with Him the whole way then I would advise them to go by all means, but to be prepared for pretty serious sacrificial giving! I think back to the early advice I was given when I first landed. A Palagi businessman put it quite simply, “It’s corrupt as hell and getting worse! Send your containers right back to NZ without even opening them and get out!” He may have warned me, “Or you’ll lose all!” too but I can’t remember that for sure.
      It’s a brutal place Keith as I think you know – the weather, the people, the culture and it’s not for the faint-hearted by any means, but I did enjoy the lifestyle and some people helped, to some degree. My standard advice would be to read as much as they could from my blogging. It sounds a little negative to Samoans but I think it’s pretty balanced and gives a good handle on reality up there.
      Hope this answers your questions well enough!
      Blessings

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